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Energy efficiency best practice guidelines

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The Energy Efficiency Best Practice Guides have been developed by Sustainability Victoria to lead decision makers and service providers through changes that deliver best practice solutions to business.

The guides will help businesses determine the limitations of their existing systems and guide them through the process towards finding the best solution in improving their existing system or designing a new system.

Best practice guides have been developed for:

Compressed air systems

A compressed air system can account for 10 per cent of overall energy costs. Improving the efficiency of compressed air system makes good business sense.

The Energy efficiency best practice guide to Compressed Air Systems is a step-by-step guide to improving energy efficiency in these systems. It provides basic information on system operation and outlines opportunities for improving system performance and efficiency, delivering cost savings for business and reducing carbon emissions.

It can help business:

  • reduce operating costs
  • improve system performance
  • reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Download the Best practice guide to Compressed Air Systems
Data centre and IT facilities

Data Centre facilities typically consume 35–50 times the amount of energy that a comparably sized office space uses and contributes large amounts of CO2 into our environment.

The Best practice guide for Data Centre and IT Facilities is a step-by-step guide to improving energy efficiency in small to medium sized data centres and information technology server facilities, up to 100m2.

This guide provides basic information on system operation and outlines opportunities for improving system performance and efficiency, delivering cost savings to business and reducing carbon emissions.

Improving the efficiency of data centres and IT facilities makes good business sense. It can help business to:

  • decrease operating and energy costs
  • increase resilience and reliability
  • increase accessibility and use of a facility
  • increase adaptability of a facility into the future
  • decrease greenhouse gas emissions.

Data centre and IT facilities efficiency improvements can have payback periods from as little as several weeks to just a few years.

Download the Best practice guide for Data Centre and IT Facilities

Industrial refrigeration

Refrigeration can be responsible for up to 85 per cent of energy costs. The Energy Efficiency Best Practice Guide to Industrial Refrigeration is a step-by-step guide to improving energy efficiency in industrial refrigeration systems. It provides basic information on system operation and outlines opportunities for improving system performance and efficiency, delivering cost savings for business and reducing carbon emissions.

Improving the efficiency of refrigeration system makes good business sense. It can help business:

  • reduce energy costs
  • reduce operation and maintenance costs
  • improve system reliability
  • improve safety
  • increase productivity
  • better match refrigeration load and equipment capacity
  • improve the working environment
  • reduce resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.
Download the Best practice guide to Industrial Refrigeration
Lighting

Lighting can be responsible for up to 50 per cent of energy costs. The Energy efficiency best practice guide to Lighting is a step-by-step guide to improving energy efficiency in lighting systems. It provides basic information on lighting and outlines opportunities for improving the operation and performance of equipment, delivering cost savings for business.

Good lighting does more than just illuminate an area.

It can help business:

  • reduce running costs
  • improve the working environment
  • improve safety
  • improve aesthetics
  • improve colour rendering
  • reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The Guide has been designed to lead decision makers and service providers through changes to lighting systems to help deliver best practice solutions to business.

The guide can help determine the best level, colour and lighting technology for business and suggests a process to achieve best practice including:

  • determining lighting requirements
  • auditing existing lights
  • ranking options
  • implementing preferred option
  • assessing the effectiveness of improvement.

There are many opportunities for cost-effective retrofits to an existing lighting system. In fact, it is possible to increase lighting levels and use less energy if the most efficient technology and practices are used.

Download the Best practice guide to Lighting
Pumping systems

Pumping applications are currently estimated to account for around 10.8 per cent of electricity in the industrial and commercial sectors.

Through simple techniques such as those shown below, you can significantly cut this energy use.

Energy savings method Savings
Replace throttling valves with speed controls 10–60%
Reduce speed for fixed load 5–40%
Install parallel system for highly variable loads 10–30%
Replace motor with a more efficient model 1–3%
Replace pump with a more efficient model 1–2%

This document is a step-by-step guide to improving energy efficiency in pumps and pumping systems for industry. It provides best practice information on pumps and pumping systems and outlines where opportunities for improving system performance and efficiency will lead to reduced energy use and benefit your business.

This guide will address common questions such as the below, and help you determine the changes that can be made to improve the equipment performance, reduce operating costs and improve environmental outcomes.

  • What are the basic components and principles of pumping systems?
  • How can I tell if the pumping system is functioning efficiently?
  • What are the areas where pumping systems can be improved to operate more efficiently?

The guide has been developed to lead decision makers and service providers through system changes; it is not intended to be a thorough technical guide.

Download the Best practice guide to Pumping Systems

Steam, hot water and process heating systems

Steam generation systems has been shown to account for 34 per cent of all energy used in production and  process heating systems can account for 17 per cent of total industrial energy use. Typically, energy improvements of 10 per cent or more can be made relatively easily through maintenance and low cost, straightforward improvements. The financial rewards of these are often immediate or have a very short payback.

Techniques to lower boiler energy use are shown below:

Energy savings method Energy savings
Improved operation and maintenance of boilers Up to 5%
Improved water treatment and boiler water conditioning Up to 2%
Total dissolved solids  control and boiler blowdown Up to 2%
Blowdown heat recovery Up to 3.75%
Boiler and burner management systems, digital combustion controls and oxygen trim Up to 5%
Combustion air preheating Up to 2%
Increase boiler feedwater temperature by 7°C  Up to 5%
Economisers Up to 5%

This document is a step-by-step guide to improving energy efficiency in steam, hot water and process heating for industry. It provides best practice information and outlines where opportunities for improving system performance and efficiency will help you reduce costs and benefit your business.

This guide will address common questions such as the below, and help you determine the changes that can be made to improve the equipment performance, reduce operating costs and improve environmental outcomes.

  • What are the basic components and principles of steam, hot water and process heating systems?
  • How can I tell if the steam, hot water and process heating system is functioning efficiently?
  • What are the areas where steam, hot water and process heating systems can be improved to operate more efficiently?

The guide has been developed to lead decision makers and service providers through system changes; it is not intended to be a thorough technical guide.

Download the Best practice guide to Steam, Hot Water and Process Heating Systems